The behavioural impact of a visually represented virtual assistant in a self-service checkout context

Jeunese A. Payne, Graham Johnson, Andrea Szymkowiak

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Our research investigated whether the presence of an interface agent -- or virtual assistant (VA) -- in a self-service checkout context has behavioural effects on the transaction process during particular tasks. While many participants claimed to have not noticed a VA within the self-service interface, behaviour was still affected, i.e. fewer people made errors with the VA present than in the voice-only and control conditions. The results are explained as reflective of an unconscious observation of non-verbal cues exhibited by the VA. The results are discussed in relation to possible behavioural outcomes of VA presence.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBCS-HCI '11
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
Place of PublicationSwinton
PublisherBCS, The Chartered Institute for IT
Pages58-63
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2011
Event25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Health, wealth and happiness - Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom
Duration: 4 Jul 20118 Jul 2011
Conference number: 25th

Conference

Conference25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction
Abbreviated titleBCS-HCI '11
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityNewcastle Upon Tyne
Period4/07/118/07/11

Cite this

Payne, J. A., Johnson, G., & Szymkowiak, A. (2011). The behavioural impact of a visually represented virtual assistant in a self-service checkout context. In BCS-HCI '11: Proceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 58-63). Swinton: BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT.
Payne, Jeunese A. ; Johnson, Graham ; Szymkowiak, Andrea. / The behavioural impact of a visually represented virtual assistant in a self-service checkout context. BCS-HCI '11: Proceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Swinton : BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, 2011. pp. 58-63
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Payne, JA, Johnson, G & Szymkowiak, A 2011, The behavioural impact of a visually represented virtual assistant in a self-service checkout context. in BCS-HCI '11: Proceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, Swinton, pp. 58-63, 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom, 4/07/11.

The behavioural impact of a visually represented virtual assistant in a self-service checkout context. / Payne, Jeunese A.; Johnson, Graham; Szymkowiak, Andrea.

BCS-HCI '11: Proceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Swinton : BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, 2011. p. 58-63.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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N2 - Our research investigated whether the presence of an interface agent -- or virtual assistant (VA) -- in a self-service checkout context has behavioural effects on the transaction process during particular tasks. While many participants claimed to have not noticed a VA within the self-service interface, behaviour was still affected, i.e. fewer people made errors with the VA present than in the voice-only and control conditions. The results are explained as reflective of an unconscious observation of non-verbal cues exhibited by the VA. The results are discussed in relation to possible behavioural outcomes of VA presence.

AB - Our research investigated whether the presence of an interface agent -- or virtual assistant (VA) -- in a self-service checkout context has behavioural effects on the transaction process during particular tasks. While many participants claimed to have not noticed a VA within the self-service interface, behaviour was still affected, i.e. fewer people made errors with the VA present than in the voice-only and control conditions. The results are explained as reflective of an unconscious observation of non-verbal cues exhibited by the VA. The results are discussed in relation to possible behavioural outcomes of VA presence.

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Payne JA, Johnson G, Szymkowiak A. The behavioural impact of a visually represented virtual assistant in a self-service checkout context. In BCS-HCI '11: Proceedings of the 25th BCS Conference on Human-Computer Interaction. Swinton: BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT. 2011. p. 58-63