The best of most worlds: shared objects for multilingual simulation

Adam T. Sampson, Paul S. Andrews

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Computing techniques are increasingly being used in scientific research to tackle a diverse set of problems. An example is complex systems research, which focuses on the use of computer simulations to explore, understand and describe the real-world system under study. These simulations are often sophisticated pieces of software with numerous design trade-offs between performance and ease of development and use. We propose a simulation framework for complex systems simulation that allows each component of a simulation--for example visualisation, or data analysis--to be developed in the most appropriate language. The framework uses the concept of shared objects to communicate data between simulation components. We present here a detailed motivation for multilingual simulations, an outline design and prototype for the simulation framework, and discuss future plans for the framework.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 9th Workshop on Parallel/High-Performance Object-Oriented Scientific Computing
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781450305464
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010
Event9th Workshop on Parallel/High-Performance Object-Oriented Scientific Computing - Reno, United States
Duration: 17 Oct 201021 Oct 2010
Conference number: 9th

Workshop

Workshop9th Workshop on Parallel/High-Performance Object-Oriented Scientific Computing
Abbreviated titlePOOSC 2010
CountryUnited States
CityReno
Period17/10/1021/10/10

    Fingerprint

Cite this

Sampson, A. T., & Andrews, P. S. (2010). The best of most worlds: shared objects for multilingual simulation. In Proceedings of the 9th Workshop on Parallel/High-Performance Object-Oriented Scientific Computing [7] Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). https://doi.org/10.1145/2039312.2039319