The development of an amperometric biosensor based on the assembly of genetically engineered enzymes for the detection of explosives

M. Kalaji*, C. Gwenin, C. Kay

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A series of nitroreductases containing sequences of cysteine amino acids, enabling strong thiolate bonds to form on a gold electrode surface without the loss of enzyme activity, were genetically engineered. The cysteines enable the orientationally controlled immobilisation of the enzymes, removing the need for pre-treatment of the electrode surface with self-assembled monolayers or conducting polymers. The enzymatically modified electrodes were utilised in the development of an amperometric biosensor for the detection of explosives containing nitro-aromatic compounds. Preliminary results demonstrate detection levels down to 5 parts per trillion, signifying tremendous promise towards an in situ sensor for the detection of vapours from explosive compounds.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication35 years of chemical sensors - an honorary symposium for Professor Jiri Janata's 70th birthday celebration
EditorsJ. Li, R. Brown, H. Hatchet, P. Vanysek, C. Bruckner-Lea, M. Josowicz
Place of PublicationPennington, NJ
PublisherThe Electrochemical Society
Pages93-102
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781607680642
ISBN (Print)9781566777148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event35 Years of Chemical Sensors - An Honorary Symposium for Professor Jiri Janata's 70th Birthday Celebration - 215th ECS Meeting - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 24 May 200929 May 2009

Publication series

NameECS Transactions
Number6
Volume19
ISSN (Print)1938-5862
ISSN (Electronic)1938-6737

Conference

Conference35 Years of Chemical Sensors - An Honorary Symposium for Professor Jiri Janata's 70th Birthday Celebration - 215th ECS Meeting
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period24/05/0929/05/09

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Chemical sensors
  • Conducting polymers
  • Electrodes
  • Enzyme activity
  • Enzyme electrodes
  • Explosives
  • Genetic engineering

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