The entrepreneurial university: an exploration of “value-creation” in a non-management department

Nnamdi O. Madichie*, Ayantunji Gbadamosi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the strategies undertaken by “entrepreneurial” universities to leverage their bottom-line especially in response to withdrawals of public funding. Internationalisation has been the most prominent from setting-up overseas branch campuses to aggressive recruitment drives for international students, and more recently, the launch of new programmes to attract a wider market.

Design/methodology/approach: Based on a documentary analysis, this study explores the future of curriculum development in entrepreneurial universities, using narratives around an “unconventional course” launch as a case illustration.

Findings: The findings reveal an interesting interaction of innovation, opportunity recognition, risk taking and pro-activeness at play within a university environment. The study also highlights how instructors have, in the past, based their syllabi on celebrities – from the Georgetown University to the University of South Carolina, University of Missouri and Rutgers University cutting across departments from English through sociology to Women’s and Gender Studies.

Practical implications: Overall this study captures the relationship between hip-hop artistry and poetry, as well as meeting the demands of society – societal impacts – not the least, bringing “street cred” into the classroom.

Social implications: The case illustration of a course launch at the University of Missouri linking hip-hop artists to curriculum development and pedagogy, opens up the discourse on the future trajectory of teaching and learning in higher education, with its attendant social implications – not the least for life after graduation.

Originality/value: This study provides fresh insights into the entrepreneurial potential of universities in co-branded/marketing activities with the hip-hop industry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-216
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Management Development
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Mar 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Entrepreneurial university
Value creation
Curriculum development
Opportunity recognition
Innovation
Artist
Celebrity
Design methodology
Poetry
Graduation
Industry
Leverage
Risk taking
Public funding
Pedagogy
International students
Sociology
Marketing activities
Discourse
Trajectory

Cite this

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title = "The entrepreneurial university: an exploration of “value-creation” in a non-management department",
abstract = "Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the strategies undertaken by “entrepreneurial” universities to leverage their bottom-line especially in response to withdrawals of public funding. Internationalisation has been the most prominent from setting-up overseas branch campuses to aggressive recruitment drives for international students, and more recently, the launch of new programmes to attract a wider market.Design/methodology/approach: Based on a documentary analysis, this study explores the future of curriculum development in entrepreneurial universities, using narratives around an “unconventional course” launch as a case illustration.Findings: The findings reveal an interesting interaction of innovation, opportunity recognition, risk taking and pro-activeness at play within a university environment. The study also highlights how instructors have, in the past, based their syllabi on celebrities – from the Georgetown University to the University of South Carolina, University of Missouri and Rutgers University cutting across departments from English through sociology to Women’s and Gender Studies.Practical implications: Overall this study captures the relationship between hip-hop artistry and poetry, as well as meeting the demands of society – societal impacts – not the least, bringing “street cred” into the classroom.Social implications: The case illustration of a course launch at the University of Missouri linking hip-hop artists to curriculum development and pedagogy, opens up the discourse on the future trajectory of teaching and learning in higher education, with its attendant social implications – not the least for life after graduation.Originality/value: This study provides fresh insights into the entrepreneurial potential of universities in co-branded/marketing activities with the hip-hop industry.",
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The entrepreneurial university : an exploration of “value-creation” in a non-management department. / Madichie, Nnamdi O.; Gbadamosi, Ayantunji.

In: Journal of Management Development, Vol. 36, No. 2, 06.03.2017, p. 196-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AB - Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the strategies undertaken by “entrepreneurial” universities to leverage their bottom-line especially in response to withdrawals of public funding. Internationalisation has been the most prominent from setting-up overseas branch campuses to aggressive recruitment drives for international students, and more recently, the launch of new programmes to attract a wider market.Design/methodology/approach: Based on a documentary analysis, this study explores the future of curriculum development in entrepreneurial universities, using narratives around an “unconventional course” launch as a case illustration.Findings: The findings reveal an interesting interaction of innovation, opportunity recognition, risk taking and pro-activeness at play within a university environment. The study also highlights how instructors have, in the past, based their syllabi on celebrities – from the Georgetown University to the University of South Carolina, University of Missouri and Rutgers University cutting across departments from English through sociology to Women’s and Gender Studies.Practical implications: Overall this study captures the relationship between hip-hop artistry and poetry, as well as meeting the demands of society – societal impacts – not the least, bringing “street cred” into the classroom.Social implications: The case illustration of a course launch at the University of Missouri linking hip-hop artists to curriculum development and pedagogy, opens up the discourse on the future trajectory of teaching and learning in higher education, with its attendant social implications – not the least for life after graduation.Originality/value: This study provides fresh insights into the entrepreneurial potential of universities in co-branded/marketing activities with the hip-hop industry.

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