The I in Autism: severity and social functioning in Autism is related to self-processing

Karri Gillespie-Smith, Carrie Ballantyne, Holly P. Branigan, David J. Turk, Sheila J. Cunningham

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Abstract

It is well established that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show impaired understanding of others and deficits within social functioning. However, it is still unknown whether self-processing is related to these impairments and to what extent self impacts social functioning and communication. Using an ownership paradigm, we show that children with ASD and chronological- and verbal-age-matched typically developing (TD) children do show the self-referential effect in memory. In addition, the self-bias was dependent on symptom severity and socio-communicative ability. Children with milder ASD symptoms were more likely to have a high self-bias, consistent with a low attention to others relative to self. In contrast, severe ASD symptoms were associated with reduced self-bias, consistent with an ‘absent-self’ hypothesis. These findings indicate that deficits in self-processing may be related to impairments in social cognition for those on the lower end of the autism spectrum.
LanguageEnglish
Pages127-141
Number of pages15
JournalBritish Journal of Developmental Psychology
Volume36
Issue number1
Early online date21 Nov 2017
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

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Autistic Disorder
Aptitude
Ownership
Cognition
Communication
Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Gillespie-Smith, Karri ; Ballantyne, Carrie ; Branigan, Holly P. ; Turk, David J. ; Cunningham, Sheila J./ The I in Autism : severity and social functioning in Autism is related to self-processing. In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology. 2018 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 127-141
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The I in Autism : severity and social functioning in Autism is related to self-processing. / Gillespie-Smith, Karri; Ballantyne, Carrie; Branigan, Holly P.; Turk, David J.; Cunningham, Sheila J.

In: British Journal of Developmental Psychology, Vol. 36, No. 1, 03.2018, p. 127-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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