The importance of improving diet in "Securing Scotland's Health"

progress towards the Scottish dietary goals

Karen L. Barton, W. L. Wrieden, J. Armstrong, A. Sherriff, A. S. Anderson, L. F. Masson

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Background: In 2013, the Revised Dietary Goals for Scotland (SDGs) were published to “indicate the direction of travel, and assist policy development to reduce the burden of obesity and diet-related disease in Scotland”. They include recommendations for foods (fruit and vegetables, oily fish and red meat) and nutrients (energy, energy density, total fat, saturated fat, trans fatty acids, sugar, salt and fibre). Progress towards the SDGs is monitored using a combination of surveys, principally the secondary analysis of the Living Costs and Food Survey (LCFS). Objective: To obtain estimates of food consumption and nutrient intake for Scotland using LCFS data from 2001 to 2013. Results: For SDGs measured using LCFS data there was little progress towards meeting the goals between 2001 and 2013. This was apparent even amongst least deprived households. Despite evidence of progress for fruit and vegetables up to 2010, consumption subsequently dropped; and there was no change in oil rich fish consumption. Mean total red meat consumption meets the SDG and a significant reduction was found between 2001 and 2013, which was partly accounted for by a fall in red meat products such as sausages and burgers. Energy density increased significantly over time despite a dip in 2012. Saturated fat, total fat and sugar intakes remained considerably higher than the SDGs. Overall there were small but significant decreases in the percentage of food energy from saturated fat and sugars, although intakes appear to have risen since 2011. There was no change in fibre intake. Conclusion: The results presented support work by Food Standards Scotland and the Scottish Government to facilitate improvements to the diet to help prevent obesity. Whilst some very small improvements were observed however, new approaches are required to encourage the population towards a healthier diet to secure Scotland’s health in the future. Funded by Food Standards Scotland, Project Number FS424018. Data provided by DEFRA, Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics, ONS and the UK Data Archive.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 5 Nov 2015
EventFaculty of Public Health Scottish Conference - Peebles Hydro Hotel, Peebles, United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Nov 20156 Nov 2015

Conference

ConferenceFaculty of Public Health Scottish Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityPeebles
Period5/11/156/11/15

Fingerprint

Scotland
Diet
Food
Health
Fats
Economics
Vegetables
Fruit
Obesity
Trans Fatty Acids
Food Analysis
Meat Products
Fish Oils
Policy Making
Fishes
Salts
Costs and Cost Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Barton, K. L., Wrieden, W. L., Armstrong, J., Sherriff, A., Anderson, A. S., & Masson, L. F. (2015). The importance of improving diet in "Securing Scotland's Health": progress towards the Scottish dietary goals. Paper presented at Faculty of Public Health Scottish Conference, Peebles, United Kingdom.
Barton, Karen L. ; Wrieden, W. L. ; Armstrong, J. ; Sherriff, A. ; Anderson, A. S. ; Masson, L. F. / The importance of improving diet in "Securing Scotland's Health" : progress towards the Scottish dietary goals. Paper presented at Faculty of Public Health Scottish Conference, Peebles, United Kingdom.
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Barton, KL, Wrieden, WL, Armstrong, J, Sherriff, A, Anderson, AS & Masson, LF 2015, 'The importance of improving diet in "Securing Scotland's Health": progress towards the Scottish dietary goals' Paper presented at Faculty of Public Health Scottish Conference, Peebles, United Kingdom, 5/11/15 - 6/11/15, .

The importance of improving diet in "Securing Scotland's Health" : progress towards the Scottish dietary goals. / Barton, Karen L.; Wrieden, W. L.; Armstrong, J.; Sherriff, A.; Anderson, A. S.; Masson, L. F.

2015. Paper presented at Faculty of Public Health Scottish Conference, Peebles, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - The importance of improving diet in "Securing Scotland's Health"

T2 - progress towards the Scottish dietary goals

AU - Barton, Karen L.

AU - Wrieden, W. L.

AU - Armstrong, J.

AU - Sherriff, A.

AU - Anderson, A. S.

AU - Masson, L. F.

PY - 2015/11/5

Y1 - 2015/11/5

N2 - Background: In 2013, the Revised Dietary Goals for Scotland (SDGs) were published to “indicate the direction of travel, and assist policy development to reduce the burden of obesity and diet-related disease in Scotland”. They include recommendations for foods (fruit and vegetables, oily fish and red meat) and nutrients (energy, energy density, total fat, saturated fat, trans fatty acids, sugar, salt and fibre). Progress towards the SDGs is monitored using a combination of surveys, principally the secondary analysis of the Living Costs and Food Survey (LCFS). Objective: To obtain estimates of food consumption and nutrient intake for Scotland using LCFS data from 2001 to 2013. Results: For SDGs measured using LCFS data there was little progress towards meeting the goals between 2001 and 2013. This was apparent even amongst least deprived households. Despite evidence of progress for fruit and vegetables up to 2010, consumption subsequently dropped; and there was no change in oil rich fish consumption. Mean total red meat consumption meets the SDG and a significant reduction was found between 2001 and 2013, which was partly accounted for by a fall in red meat products such as sausages and burgers. Energy density increased significantly over time despite a dip in 2012. Saturated fat, total fat and sugar intakes remained considerably higher than the SDGs. Overall there were small but significant decreases in the percentage of food energy from saturated fat and sugars, although intakes appear to have risen since 2011. There was no change in fibre intake. Conclusion: The results presented support work by Food Standards Scotland and the Scottish Government to facilitate improvements to the diet to help prevent obesity. Whilst some very small improvements were observed however, new approaches are required to encourage the population towards a healthier diet to secure Scotland’s health in the future. Funded by Food Standards Scotland, Project Number FS424018. Data provided by DEFRA, Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics, ONS and the UK Data Archive.

AB - Background: In 2013, the Revised Dietary Goals for Scotland (SDGs) were published to “indicate the direction of travel, and assist policy development to reduce the burden of obesity and diet-related disease in Scotland”. They include recommendations for foods (fruit and vegetables, oily fish and red meat) and nutrients (energy, energy density, total fat, saturated fat, trans fatty acids, sugar, salt and fibre). Progress towards the SDGs is monitored using a combination of surveys, principally the secondary analysis of the Living Costs and Food Survey (LCFS). Objective: To obtain estimates of food consumption and nutrient intake for Scotland using LCFS data from 2001 to 2013. Results: For SDGs measured using LCFS data there was little progress towards meeting the goals between 2001 and 2013. This was apparent even amongst least deprived households. Despite evidence of progress for fruit and vegetables up to 2010, consumption subsequently dropped; and there was no change in oil rich fish consumption. Mean total red meat consumption meets the SDG and a significant reduction was found between 2001 and 2013, which was partly accounted for by a fall in red meat products such as sausages and burgers. Energy density increased significantly over time despite a dip in 2012. Saturated fat, total fat and sugar intakes remained considerably higher than the SDGs. Overall there were small but significant decreases in the percentage of food energy from saturated fat and sugars, although intakes appear to have risen since 2011. There was no change in fibre intake. Conclusion: The results presented support work by Food Standards Scotland and the Scottish Government to facilitate improvements to the diet to help prevent obesity. Whilst some very small improvements were observed however, new approaches are required to encourage the population towards a healthier diet to secure Scotland’s health in the future. Funded by Food Standards Scotland, Project Number FS424018. Data provided by DEFRA, Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics, ONS and the UK Data Archive.

M3 - Paper

ER -

Barton KL, Wrieden WL, Armstrong J, Sherriff A, Anderson AS, Masson LF. The importance of improving diet in "Securing Scotland's Health": progress towards the Scottish dietary goals. 2015. Paper presented at Faculty of Public Health Scottish Conference, Peebles, United Kingdom.