The importance of wood-decay fungi in forest ecosystems

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter considers the role of wood-decay fungi in forest ecosystems in the broadest sense, embracing examples of fungi displaying wood and litter degradative activities, even if only transiently. The aim is to emphasize the fundamental significance and pervasiveness of wood-decay activity as an integral process in ecosystem functioning. I therefore present a coherent text of diverse themes, but not a comprehensive treatise of any. Each individual topic presented offers an overview of material that has formed the basis of many individual and extensive texts. I have therefore been selective, have tried to avoid lists of species and instead attempted to highlight important ecological activities, features, trends, and concepts. In examining the current status of knowledge, I have on occasion restated familiar works, thus providing progression to more recent research. As a result of my own background and interests examples are mostly drawn from the Northern Hemisphere and information regarding, for example, important tropical biomes, has largely been omitted. The chapter aims to identify some general concepts underpinning wood-decay fungal ecology, and provide guided access to pertinent literature where possible. I conclude by identifying neglected arenas of study and speculating on future research trends. After-all, continued investigation concerned with wood-decay fungi and their role in forest ecosystems is an academically challenging and immensely important process in biological, ecological as well as practical terms.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFungal biotechnology in agricultural, food, and environmental applications
EditorsDilip K. Arora, Paul D. Bridge, Deepak Bhatnagar
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherMarcel Dekker Inc.
Chapter32
Pages375-392
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9780203913369
ISBN (Print)9780824747701
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Publication series

NameMycology
PublisherMarcel Dekker
Volume21

Fingerprint

forest ecosystem
fungus
biome
Northern Hemisphere
litter
ecology
ecosystem
trend

Cite this

White, N. A. (2003). The importance of wood-decay fungi in forest ecosystems. In D. K. Arora, P. D. Bridge, & D. Bhatnagar (Eds.), Fungal biotechnology in agricultural, food, and environmental applications (pp. 375-392). (Mycology; Vol. 21). New York: Marcel Dekker Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203913369
White, Nia A. / The importance of wood-decay fungi in forest ecosystems. Fungal biotechnology in agricultural, food, and environmental applications. editor / Dilip K. Arora ; Paul D. Bridge ; Deepak Bhatnagar. New York : Marcel Dekker Inc., 2003. pp. 375-392 (Mycology).
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White, NA 2003, The importance of wood-decay fungi in forest ecosystems. in DK Arora, PD Bridge & D Bhatnagar (eds), Fungal biotechnology in agricultural, food, and environmental applications. Mycology, vol. 21, Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, pp. 375-392. https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203913369

The importance of wood-decay fungi in forest ecosystems. / White, Nia A.

Fungal biotechnology in agricultural, food, and environmental applications. ed. / Dilip K. Arora; Paul D. Bridge; Deepak Bhatnagar. New York : Marcel Dekker Inc., 2003. p. 375-392 (Mycology; Vol. 21).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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White NA. The importance of wood-decay fungi in forest ecosystems. In Arora DK, Bridge PD, Bhatnagar D, editors, Fungal biotechnology in agricultural, food, and environmental applications. New York: Marcel Dekker Inc. 2003. p. 375-392. (Mycology). https://doi.org/10.1201/9780203913369