The perspectives of stakeholders of intellectual disability liaison nurses: a model of compassionate, person-centred care

Michael Brown*, Zoë Chouliara, Juliet Macarthur, Andrew Mckechanie, Siobhan Mack, Matt Hayes, Joan Fletcher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To investigate the experiences of patients with intellectual disabilities, family and paid carers regarding the role of liaison nurses and the delivery of compassionate, person-centred care. From this to propose a model of person-centred care embedded in these experiences. Background: People with intellectual disabilities have a high number of comorbidities, requiring multidisciplinary care, and are at high risk of morbidity and preventable mortality. Provision of compassionate, person-centred care is essential to prevent complications and avoid death. Design: A qualitative design was adopted with Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis for data analysis. Methods: Semistructured interviews and focus groups were conducted. Data were analysed with a focus on compassionate, person-centred care elements and components. Themes were modelled to develop a clinically meaningful model for practice. Results: Themes identified vulnerability, presence and the human interface; information balance; critical points and broken trust; roles and responsibilities; managing multiple transitions; 'flagging up' and communication. Conclusions: The findings provide the first 'anatomy' of compassionate, person-centred care and provide a model for operationalising this approach in practice. The applicability of the model will have to be evaluated further with this and other vulnerable groups. Relevance to clinical practice: This is the first study to provide a definition of compassionate, person-centred care and proposes a model to support its application into clinical practice for this and other vulnerable groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)972-982
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume25
Issue number7-8
Early online date11 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Intellectual Disability
Nurses
Nurse's Role
Disabled Persons
Focus Groups
Caregivers
Comorbidity
Anatomy
Communication
Interviews
Morbidity
Mortality

Cite this

Brown, Michael ; Chouliara, Zoë ; Macarthur, Juliet ; Mckechanie, Andrew ; Mack, Siobhan ; Hayes, Matt ; Fletcher, Joan. / The perspectives of stakeholders of intellectual disability liaison nurses : a model of compassionate, person-centred care. In: Journal of Clinical Nursing. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 7-8. pp. 972-982.
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The perspectives of stakeholders of intellectual disability liaison nurses : a model of compassionate, person-centred care. / Brown, Michael; Chouliara, Zoë; Macarthur, Juliet; Mckechanie, Andrew; Mack, Siobhan; Hayes, Matt; Fletcher, Joan.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 7-8, 01.04.2016, p. 972-982.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Mack, Siobhan

AU - Hayes, Matt

AU - Fletcher, Joan

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