The relationship between self-presentational concerns and competitive anxiety: the influence of gender

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Abstract

This investigation examined competitive anxiety, self-presentational concerns, and the influence of gender. Three hundred and fifteen athletes completed the Sport Anxiety Scale and the Self-Presentation in Sport Questionnaire. Comparison revealed that females displayed higher levels of self-presentational concerns and competitive anxiety. Regression analyses revealed that concerns about performance/composure inadequacy were the largest predictor of competitive anxiety factors for all athletes (somatic anxiety, worry, & concentrations disruption). In all cases, self-presentational concerns showed the strongest association with worry. Self-presentational concerns predicted moderately more variation in competitive anxiety for females than males. Increased understanding of the relationship between self-presentation and anxiety will allow the development of more effective interventions to manage the influence of competitive anxiety.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Psychology
Volume37
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2006

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Anxiety
Athletes
Sports
Regression Analysis

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title = "The relationship between self-presentational concerns and competitive anxiety: the influence of gender",
abstract = "This investigation examined competitive anxiety, self-presentational concerns, and the influence of gender. Three hundred and fifteen athletes completed the Sport Anxiety Scale and the Self-Presentation in Sport Questionnaire. Comparison revealed that females displayed higher levels of self-presentational concerns and competitive anxiety. Regression analyses revealed that concerns about performance/composure inadequacy were the largest predictor of competitive anxiety factors for all athletes (somatic anxiety, worry, & concentrations disruption). In all cases, self-presentational concerns showed the strongest association with worry. Self-presentational concerns predicted moderately more variation in competitive anxiety for females than males. Increased understanding of the relationship between self-presentation and anxiety will allow the development of more effective interventions to manage the influence of competitive anxiety.",
author = "Ross Lorimer",
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