The self-reference effect on memory in early childhood

Sheila J. Cunningham, Joanne L. Brebner, Francis Quinn, David J. Turk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The self-reference effect in memory is the advantage for information encoded about self, relative to other people. The early development of this effect was explored here using a concrete encoding paradigm. Trials comprised presentation of a self- or other-image paired with a concrete object. In Study 1, 4- to 6-year-old children (N = 53) were asked in each trial whether the child pictured would like the object. Recognition memory showed an advantage for self-paired objects. Study 2 (N = 55) replicated this finding in source memory. In Study 3 (N = 56), participants simply indicated object location. Again, recognition and source memory showed an advantage for self-paired items. These findings are discussed with reference to mechanisms that ensure information of potential self-relevance is reliably encoded.
LanguageEnglish
Pages808-823
Number of pages16
JournalChild Development
Volume85
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 25 Jul 2013

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Cunningham, S. J., Brebner, J. L., Quinn, F., & Turk, D. J. (2013). The self-reference effect on memory in early childhood. Child Development, 85(2), 808-823. DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12144
Cunningham, Sheila J. ; Brebner, Joanne L. ; Quinn, Francis ; Turk, David J./ The self-reference effect on memory in early childhood. In: Child Development. 2013 ; Vol. 85, No. 2. pp. 808-823
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Cunningham, SJ, Brebner, JL, Quinn, F & Turk, DJ 2013, 'The self-reference effect on memory in early childhood' Child Development, vol. 85, no. 2, pp. 808-823. DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12144

The self-reference effect on memory in early childhood. / Cunningham, Sheila J.; Brebner, Joanne L.; Quinn, Francis; Turk, David J.

In: Child Development, Vol. 85, No. 2, 25.07.2013, p. 808-823.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Cunningham SJ, Brebner JL, Quinn F, Turk DJ. The self-reference effect on memory in early childhood. Child Development. 2013 Jul 25;85(2):808-823. Available from, DOI: 10.1111/cdev.12144