Use of low-pressure storage to improve the quality of tomatoes

Penta Pristijono, Christopher J. Scarlett, Michael C. Bowyer, Quan V. Vuong, Costas E. Stathopoulos, Andrew J. Jessup, John B. Golding

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    Abstract

    Freshly harvested vine-ripened tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Neang Pich) were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) at 10°C for 11 days with 100% RH. Fruit quality was examined upon removal and after being transferred to normal atmosphere (101 kPa) at 20°C for 3 days. Weight loss was significantly lower in fruits which were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) than in fruits that were stored at regular atmosphere (101 kPa) at 10°C. Fruits that were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) reduced calyx browning by 12.5%, and calyx rots by 16%, compared to fruits that were stored at regular atmosphere (101 kPa) at 10°C. Fruit firmness was not significantly different between fruits stored at low pressures (4 kPa) and the normal atmosphere (101 kPa), with an average firmness of 14 N after fruits were stored at 10°C for 11 days. There was no difference in the SSC/TA ratio. The results suggest that a low pressure of 4 kPa at 10°C has potential as an alternative, non-chemical postharvest treatment to improve tomato quality during storage.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)583-590
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology
    Volume92
    Issue number6
    Early online date10 Apr 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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    tomatoes
    fruits
    calyx
    firmness
    postharvest treatment
    Solanum lycopersicum
    storage quality
    vines
    fruit quality
    weight loss

    Cite this

    Pristijono, P., Scarlett, C. J., Bowyer, M. C., Vuong, Q. V., Stathopoulos, C. E., Jessup, A. J., & Golding, J. B. (2017). Use of low-pressure storage to improve the quality of tomatoes. Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology, 92(6), 583-590 . https://doi.org/10.1080/14620316.2017.1301222
    Pristijono, Penta ; Scarlett, Christopher J. ; Bowyer, Michael C. ; Vuong, Quan V. ; Stathopoulos, Costas E. ; Jessup, Andrew J. ; Golding, John B. / Use of low-pressure storage to improve the quality of tomatoes. In: Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology. 2017 ; Vol. 92, No. 6. pp. 583-590 .
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    abstract = "Freshly harvested vine-ripened tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Neang Pich) were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) at 10°C for 11 days with 100{\%} RH. Fruit quality was examined upon removal and after being transferred to normal atmosphere (101 kPa) at 20°C for 3 days. Weight loss was significantly lower in fruits which were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) than in fruits that were stored at regular atmosphere (101 kPa) at 10°C. Fruits that were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) reduced calyx browning by 12.5{\%}, and calyx rots by 16{\%}, compared to fruits that were stored at regular atmosphere (101 kPa) at 10°C. Fruit firmness was not significantly different between fruits stored at low pressures (4 kPa) and the normal atmosphere (101 kPa), with an average firmness of 14 N after fruits were stored at 10°C for 11 days. There was no difference in the SSC/TA ratio. The results suggest that a low pressure of 4 kPa at 10°C has potential as an alternative, non-chemical postharvest treatment to improve tomato quality during storage.",
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    Pristijono, P, Scarlett, CJ, Bowyer, MC, Vuong, QV, Stathopoulos, CE, Jessup, AJ & Golding, JB 2017, 'Use of low-pressure storage to improve the quality of tomatoes', Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology, vol. 92, no. 6, pp. 583-590 . https://doi.org/10.1080/14620316.2017.1301222

    Use of low-pressure storage to improve the quality of tomatoes. / Pristijono, Penta; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Bowyer, Michael C.; Vuong, Quan V.; Stathopoulos, Costas E.; Jessup, Andrew J.; Golding, John B.

    In: Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology, Vol. 92, No. 6, 2017, p. 583-590 .

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Use of low-pressure storage to improve the quality of tomatoes

    AU - Pristijono, Penta

    AU - Scarlett, Christopher J.

    AU - Bowyer, Michael C.

    AU - Vuong, Quan V.

    AU - Stathopoulos, Costas E.

    AU - Jessup, Andrew J.

    AU - Golding, John B.

    PY - 2017

    Y1 - 2017

    N2 - Freshly harvested vine-ripened tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Neang Pich) were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) at 10°C for 11 days with 100% RH. Fruit quality was examined upon removal and after being transferred to normal atmosphere (101 kPa) at 20°C for 3 days. Weight loss was significantly lower in fruits which were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) than in fruits that were stored at regular atmosphere (101 kPa) at 10°C. Fruits that were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) reduced calyx browning by 12.5%, and calyx rots by 16%, compared to fruits that were stored at regular atmosphere (101 kPa) at 10°C. Fruit firmness was not significantly different between fruits stored at low pressures (4 kPa) and the normal atmosphere (101 kPa), with an average firmness of 14 N after fruits were stored at 10°C for 11 days. There was no difference in the SSC/TA ratio. The results suggest that a low pressure of 4 kPa at 10°C has potential as an alternative, non-chemical postharvest treatment to improve tomato quality during storage.

    AB - Freshly harvested vine-ripened tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Neang Pich) were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) at 10°C for 11 days with 100% RH. Fruit quality was examined upon removal and after being transferred to normal atmosphere (101 kPa) at 20°C for 3 days. Weight loss was significantly lower in fruits which were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) than in fruits that were stored at regular atmosphere (101 kPa) at 10°C. Fruits that were stored at low pressure (4 kPa) reduced calyx browning by 12.5%, and calyx rots by 16%, compared to fruits that were stored at regular atmosphere (101 kPa) at 10°C. Fruit firmness was not significantly different between fruits stored at low pressures (4 kPa) and the normal atmosphere (101 kPa), with an average firmness of 14 N after fruits were stored at 10°C for 11 days. There was no difference in the SSC/TA ratio. The results suggest that a low pressure of 4 kPa at 10°C has potential as an alternative, non-chemical postharvest treatment to improve tomato quality during storage.

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    DO - 10.1080/14620316.2017.1301222

    M3 - Article

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    JF - Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology

    SN - 2380-4084

    IS - 6

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    Pristijono P, Scarlett CJ, Bowyer MC, Vuong QV, Stathopoulos CE, Jessup AJ et al. Use of low-pressure storage to improve the quality of tomatoes. Journal of Horticultural Science and Biotechnology. 2017;92(6):583-590 . https://doi.org/10.1080/14620316.2017.1301222