Women's experiences of student presence in consultations for problematic uterine bleeding

Jennifer Guise, Joyce Willock, Pam Warner, Andrew Calder, Hilary Critchley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 4 Citations

Abstract

Research suggests that although a high proportion of patients accept the presence of students in gynaecological consultations, issues of consent, privacy and comfort are important. This study considers women's views on the impact of student presence on communication in the consultation. Our research suggests that student presence may distort the flow of communication in the gynaecological consultation. There are implications for both patient satisfaction and clinician training. If students are introduced into the consultation, clinical tutors should take special care to maintain dedicated communication with the patient.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)871-873
Number of pages3
JournalBJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Volume111
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

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Guise, Jennifer; Willock, Joyce; Warner, Pam; Calder, Andrew; Critchley, Hilary / Women's experiences of student presence in consultations for problematic uterine bleeding.

In: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Vol. 111, No. 8, 08.2004, p. 871-873.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Women's experiences of student presence in consultations for problematic uterine bleeding. / Guise, Jennifer; Willock, Joyce; Warner, Pam; Calder, Andrew; Critchley, Hilary.

In: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Vol. 111, No. 8, 08.2004, p. 871-873.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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