Working towards fostering programming acceptance in the everyday lives of older and adult people with low levels of formal education: a qualitative case study

Sergio Sayago, Angel Bergantinos, Paula Forbes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

With the ever-increasing development of digital technologies, understanding their acceptance or rejection is important. A great deal of research, led by the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), shows that technology acceptance is a hot and complex topic. Much of it has been quantitative and operationalized within mandatory—workplace/organizational—contexts, where instrumental aspects of technology use (e.g., efficiency and productivity) play a central role. In this chapter, we report on a qualitative case study—based on 3 in-person learning courses—of factors that can help us foster programming acceptance in the everyday lives of older and adult people with low levels of formal education. We discuss the relative relevance of technology acceptance constructs, showing that perceived ease-of-use is much less relevant than perceived usefulness, because all participants had to find the fit of programming in their lives. We show that two social aspects—the figure of the course instructor and the group—were key to introduce programming and encourage decision-making. We also discuss some methodological issues, such as the difficulties in asking validated items of TAM (e.g. “I have the knowledge necessary to use the system”) to our participants.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction research with older people
EditorsSergio Sayago
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Chapter15
Pages237-252
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9783030060763
ISBN (Print)9783030060756
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2019

Publication series

NameHuman-Computer Interaction Series (HCIS)
PublisherSpringer
ISSN (Print)1571-5035
ISSN (Electronic)2524-4477

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everyday life
acceptance
programming
education
instructor
productivity
decision making
efficiency
human being
learning

Cite this

Sayago, S., Bergantinos, A., & Forbes, P. (2019). Working towards fostering programming acceptance in the everyday lives of older and adult people with low levels of formal education: a qualitative case study. In S. Sayago (Ed.), Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction research with older people (pp. 237-252). (Human-Computer Interaction Series (HCIS)). Cham: Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06076-3_15
Sayago, Sergio ; Bergantinos, Angel ; Forbes, Paula. / Working towards fostering programming acceptance in the everyday lives of older and adult people with low levels of formal education : a qualitative case study. Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction research with older people. editor / Sergio Sayago. Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2019. pp. 237-252 (Human-Computer Interaction Series (HCIS)).
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Sayago, S, Bergantinos, A & Forbes, P 2019, Working towards fostering programming acceptance in the everyday lives of older and adult people with low levels of formal education: a qualitative case study. in S Sayago (ed.), Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction research with older people. Human-Computer Interaction Series (HCIS), Springer International Publishing, Cham, pp. 237-252. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06076-3_15

Working towards fostering programming acceptance in the everyday lives of older and adult people with low levels of formal education : a qualitative case study. / Sayago, Sergio; Bergantinos, Angel; Forbes, Paula.

Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction research with older people. ed. / Sergio Sayago. Cham : Springer International Publishing, 2019. p. 237-252 (Human-Computer Interaction Series (HCIS)).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Sayago S, Bergantinos A, Forbes P. Working towards fostering programming acceptance in the everyday lives of older and adult people with low levels of formal education: a qualitative case study. In Sayago S, editor, Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction research with older people. Cham: Springer International Publishing. 2019. p. 237-252. (Human-Computer Interaction Series (HCIS)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06076-3_15