The effects of short duration, combined sprint interval training on performance measures

Student thesis: Doctoral Thesis

Abstract

Sprint interval training (SIT) has been shown to be a time efficient training modality for improving performance measures such as peak oxygen uptake, incremental time to exhaustion, and power output. Whilst this is beneficial, literature has focussed on the use of lower extremity SIT, despite contributions from both lower and upper extremities in sporting performance. Furthermore, limited investigation has occurred into the acute programme variables involved with SIT.

The overarching aim of this thesis was to investigate the effects of combined lower and upper extremity SIT on performance measures. To achieve this, the thesis utilised three intervention based studies, each with the following primary aims: 1) to investigate the effects of applied resistance during a combined lower and upper extremity SIT intervention on performance measures; 2) to determine the effect of a combined lower and upper extremity SIT protocol on recovery duration outcomes and performance measures; 3) to determine the effects of a short duration, combined lower and upper extremity SIT protocol on combat sport performance. To achieve these aims, each intervention utilised combined extremity SIT (lower and upper body sprints, 8 x 10 s sprints, sprints interspersed with a 30 s recovery, extremities interspersed with a period of recovery) of varying durations, with the findings from each study setting up the following interventions.

This thesis demonstrates that combined extremity SIT is an effective training modality for improving an array of anaerobic and aerobic performance measures, with the applied resistance effecting the magnitude of adaptation gained. Furthermore, this training modality can improve the rate of recovery following exercise, and is a time efficient manner for improving combat sport performance. Collectively, this thesis improves the current understanding of SIT, establishes combined extremity SIT as a practical training paradigm for improving performance measures, and demonstrates that combined extremity SIT is a time efficient and effective training modality for improving combat sport performance.
Date of Award26 Feb 2021
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • Abertay University
SupervisorJohn Babraj (Supervisor) & Ashley Williams (Supervisor)

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